Mike Tyson launches luxury marijuana resort in California, as state’s Green Rush finds celebrity backers

Controversial boxing champ Mike Tyson has broken ground on a 40-acre marijuana growing operation and luxury resort close to Edwards Air Force Base, celebrity blog The Blast reports.

The Tyson Ranch will have half of its acreage devoted to cultivating marijuana and the other half developed into a high-end retreat with “glamping” cabins, an edible factory and an amphitheater. Tyson, who is backing the project with business partners including California City Mayor Jennifer Wood and two entrepreneurs, Robert Hickman and Jay Strommen, also reportedly plans to create a Tyson Cultivation School at the site.

“Tthe company that operates the ranch, Tyson Holistic, is comprised mainly of veterans, and says taking care of men and women who have served in the armed forces is a top priority,” The Blast reports. “The ranch is located near Edwards Air Force Base and aims at creating lots of jobs, as well as connect with and give back to the community. The mayor describes the business venture as a ‘rebirth’ for the entire city.”

You can read more about the property, and see schematics of what it will look like, here.

In California, high hopes for ‘green rush’ with advent of legal pot

LOS ANGELES: At the stroke of midnight on January 1, pot lovers in California may raise a joint, instead of a glass of champagne.

America’s wealthiest state is legalizing the growth, sale and consumption of recreational marijuana, opening the door to the world’s biggest market.

With authorities looking to cash in via heavy taxes, the stakes are high—and the Golden State’s so-called “green rush” will be watched closely.

Arcview, a firm that studies the global cannabis market, estimates that it will be worth $22.6 billion in 2021, up from $6.7 billion in 2016.

Cannabis is displayed at the Higher Path medical marijuana dispensary in the San Fernando Valley area of Los Angeles, California, December 27, 2017. AFP PHOTO

In California alone, the industry will be worth $5.8 billion in 2021, with almost three quarters of that from recreational use.

But 2018’s transition will not be automatic—or simple.

Although eight other states and the capital Washington have already legalized recreational marijuana use, none compare to the sheer size of California.

“The first year, two years are going to be a mess,” as cities determine their own regulations and supply and demand is established, predicts Arcview CEO Troy Dayton.

California already pioneered the legalization of medicinal cannabis in 1996, and approved the current law in 2016.

But the substance is still considered illegal under federal law, and the administration of President Donald Trump has been hostile on the issue.

Thriving black market?

According to the new law in California, anyone older than 21 can get up to 28.5 grams (one ounce) of cannabis without a prescription and grow up to six plants per residence.

It cannot be consumed in public places or while driving—nor can it be used within 1,000 feet (about 300 meters) of a school or other place for children.

The production, distribution and sale of marijuana also requires municipal and state permits.

Cities such as San Francisco, San Diego and San Jose have wasted no time, already issuing licenses to several dispensaries that can start selling recreational marijuana on Monday.

But in Los Angeles, there is a wait.

Seller Jerred Kiloh, who runs a thriving medical dispensary, will not be able to join the New Year’s party as authorities will only begin to accept applications on January 3.

Cat Packer, chief of Los Angeles’ cannabis regulation department, said the process “is not going to happen overnight.”

On one December afternoon, Kiloh’s dispensary is full.

Leaving the shop, a man says “I love your store”—which has a distinctive smell and products ranging from cannabis flowers to creams, cakes and candies.

Kiloh, who has been in the industry for a decade, says his biggest concern is that while he is closed awaiting a license, hundreds of other shops will be operating without one— offering attractive prices and drawing customers away.

Dispensaries can be seen on every corner, but it is hard to know which ones are legal.

Kiloh—who is also an economist and president of plant-based therapeutics corporation United Cannabis—claims “about 80 percent of the industry that operates in Los Angeles right now operates without a permit and without paying taxes.”

He also estimates only 135 shops operate above board.

According to Arcview, the illegal market generated $5.1 billion in 2016.

‘Crazy fluctuation’

Authorities in Los Angeles have said they are working on a plan to combat illicit drug trading.

For example, the police have the power to cut off electricity and water at illegal vendors.

Other more conservative cities will simply prohibit sales.

Meanwhile, some projections estimate that costs could hike up to 70 percent—due to state tax set at 15 percent, 10 percent sales tax, and municipal taxes of up to 10 percent on top of that—as well as license requirements and required technology such as trackers for each plant.

“You could see some crazy fluctuation in price over the first year or two,” said Dayton.

Marijuana for medical use should become cheaper and available for purchase in more quantities.

Kiloh estimates that to meet current demand, “you’d probably have to have 10,000 licenses available right now” in California.

In neighboring Nevada in July, when recreational marijuana went on sale, emergency measures had to be implemented to allow distributors to meet the astronomical demand. AFP

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To read more visit: http://www.manilatimes.net/california-high-hopes-green-rush-advent-legal-pot/371306/

California’s green rush is on as state legalizes recreational marijuana sales

The new year brought with it a big change in California – the legalization of recreational marijuana. Adults, 21 and over, are now allowed to buy cannabis products at licensed dispensaries without a medical card.

CGTN’s May Lee has more.

The celebrations have begun across the state of California as recreational use of marijuana is now officially legal. Customers stood in long lines at licensed dispensaries to be the first to buy cannabis products openly.

“It’s a historic moment” said one shopper. “We were in line for an hour and a half, and I think it’s great that I’m able to come in and do this today. It is a great day.”

At Alternative Herbal Health Services, also known as AhhsWeho, in West Hollywood, business has been brisk. Dina Browner, one of AhhsWeho’s founding partners, is a pioneer in the world of cannabis, having led the way when it was thought of as nothing but an illicit drug.

Browner recalls, “We started here 15 years ago, and I actually started the first, opening the very first doctor’s office that specialized in medical cannabis recommendations in Los Angeles.”

So well-known is Browner’s dispensary that it’s the role model for the Netflix comedy series “Disjointed”. For real-life AhhsWeho customers, the legalization of marijuana gives them, not only more freedom, but also serious relief.

Robert Hughes is a combat veteran who served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 2005 to 2009 said he suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder. He added, “I think it should have been something available a long time ago especially for troops that are coming back that are suffering from mental illnesses.”

There are, however, concerns that the legalization of marijuana will boost a black market because the price of legal cannabis is now higher due to taxes and other costs. Another concern- Will there be legal clashes among federal, state and city jurisdictions that have differing marijuana laws?

Twilla Frosco, a tourist from Oklahoma, isn’t sure what’s in store when she tries to return home with her cannabis, but she said, “I’m going to figure it out.”

Though there are still many unknowns when it comes to the marijuana laws here in California, there’s one thing that isn’t really being questioned and that is the potential size of the market. It’s predicted to grow to about seven billion dollars in a few years. That’s much bigger than the entire market was in the U.S. in 2016.

To read more visit: https://america.cgtn.com/2018/01/03/californias-green-rush-is-on-as-state-legalizes-recreational-marijuana-sales