As Of Late June, Aurora Had 16,000 Active Registered Patients Less Than 18 Months After Its First Sale.

Marijuana buds and pill bottle on top of money I don’t expect the stock Green Rush to perform like it did in 2016 in the remainder of the year, but there are several reasons to anticipate a strong finish for Aurora in 2017. The company ranks as one of the largest licensed providers of medical marijuana in Canada. This market continues to expand. As of late June, Aurora had 16,000 active registered patients less than 18 months after its first sale. The company added 3,000 of those patients in May and June alone. If this recent momentum continues (which I think will be the case), Aurora’s revenue should increase tremendously in the next few months. Aurora also stands to benefit from its expansion into the German market. Germany legalized medical marijuana earlier this year, but the country is importing the drug until it can establish a regulatory program for cultivation. That has opened a big market to Canadian marijuana growers in particular. Aurora has jumped on this opportunity by acquiring Pedanios GmbH, a leading German wholesale importer, exporter, and distributor of medical cannabis, a few months ago. Then there’s the potential for Canada to legalize recreational marijuana.

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Listen To The Interview Or Read “weed Entrepreneur Brings In Over $1 Million A Year Running ‘bud And Breakfast’ Hotels”: Http:// Before This Cannabis Stock News Is Here, It’s Published To Subscribers On 420 Investor.

mjmj 1mo Joel Schneider, CEO of The MaryJane Group The company quit filing with the SEC last March and is delinquent in issuing its annual filing for the year ending 4/30/16 as well as the the following two quarters. Schneider stated that his company has delisted, but this is not true, as the company continues to trade on the OTC Pink Sheets. Our call to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) confirmed that the stock has not been delisted. The publicity of the interview seems to have sparked interest in the stock, which saw a big increase in volume, with 142mm shares trading,  as it moved to the highest level in more than a month: We emailed the company in order to find out why it isn’t filing with the SEC but received no response, and we called the corporate headquarters and each of the three properties only to get stuck in a loop of an automated marijuana call answering system earlier today. While Schneider painted a rosy picture as he called out annual revenues in excess of $1mm, investors should be cautious trading in the stock given the lack of compliance with the regulatory requirements of filing periodic updates. CNBC inadvertently pumped a worthless penny stock apparently. Listen to the interview or read “Weed entrepreneur brings in over $1 million a year running ‘bud and breakfast’ hotels”: Before this cannabis stock news is here, it’s published to subscribers on 420 Investor. Based in Houston, Alan leverages his experience as founder of online communities 420 Investor , the first and still largest due diligence platform focused on the publicly-traded stocks in the cannabis industry. With his extensive network in the cannabis community, Alan continues to find new ways to connect the industry and facilitate its sustainable growth. At New Cannabis Ventures , he is responsible for content development and strategic alliances.

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San Francisco plans to wipe out thousands of older marijuana convictions

SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco’s district attorney said Wednesday that city prosecutors will toss out or reduce thousands of criminal convictions for marijuana dating back decades, a move allowed under the 2016 state ballot measure legalizing recreational sales of pot.

District Attorney George Gascón said his office will dismiss nearly 3,000 misdemeanor cases and review nearly 5,000 felony cases for possible action.

Proposition 64 legalized the recreational use of marijuana. It also allowed people convicted of marijuana charges to petition courts to toss out the cases or reduce penalties.

Gascón says that process can be time-consuming and costly, so prosecutors in the district attorney’s office plan to review and wipe out eligible cases en masse. Some people with convictions may not know they are eligible, Gascón said.

“A misdemeanor or felony conviction can have significant implications for employment, housing, and other benefits,” Gascón said. He said prosecutors will review cases from 1975 through passage of Proposition 64 in November 2016.

He said 23 petitions for dismissal or reduction have been filed in San Francisco since passage of Proposition 64.

As of September, around 5,000 people had applied for a change to their records, according to state data. That’s a fraction of the people that experts estimate are eligible.

Laura Thomas, deputy state director for the pro-marijuana organization Drug Policy Alliance, estimated more than 100,000 people are eligible to have their records changed.

Assemblyman Rob Bonta, a Democrat from Oakland, introduced legislation on Jan. 9 that would require county courts to automatically expunge eligible records.

Recreational marijuana became legal in California last year, and on Jan. 1 it became legal for licensed dispensaries to sell it to non-medical patients.

The U.S. Justice Department announced earlier this year that it’s halting an Obama-era policy to take a hands-off approach toward states that have legalized marijuana. Pot is still illegal under federal law.

The federal move could lead to increased prosecutions of marijuana sellers and growers, although it’s unclear how aggressive federal attorneys will be.

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Wow! Here’s How Much Marijuana Canadians Bought in 2017

That’s a lot of zeroes.

Feb 3, 2018 at 11:41AM
There’s a really good reason the marijuana industry is called the “green rush” — growth has been veritably unstoppable. According to ArcView, a leading cannabis research company, legal cannabis sales are expected to grow by 26% a year through 2021. Should this forecast come to fruition, the North American market could be generating almost $22 billion in annual sales.Consumer opinions on pot have also been improving at a steady pace. Back in 1995, the year before California became the first state to legalize medicinal cannabis, just a quarter of the respondents in Gallup’s annual survey favored legalizing weed. By October 2017, this favorability reached an all-time high of 64%.

A tale of two North American markets

Nevertheless, there’s a big difference among the U.S. and Canadian cannabis markets in North America. The U.S. has grown into a market that genuinely doesn’t support the expansion of marijuana. It remains a Schedule I substance at the federal level, meaning it’s wholly illegal, is prone to abuse, and has no recognized medical benefits. What’s more, Attorney General Jeff Sessions recently rescinded the Cole memo, which was a loose set of rules that legalized states abided by to keep the federal government off their backs. This included keeping cannabis away from adolescents, as well as keeping legal weed within a state.

By comparison, Canada has become the blueprint of success for the marijuana industry. Medicinal cannabis has been legal since 2001, and Health Canada continues to oversee the issuance of licenses for the medical industry. In fact, a handful of Canadian growers have been generating profits solely on account on medical marijuana sales thanks to growing patient demand, and strong patient enrollment.

Furthermore, Canada appears to be on the verge of legalizing recreational pot this coming summer. Conservatives, and those who oppose the expansion of legal weed, are in the minority in Canada’s parliament, and the federal government recently proposed a tax-sharing agreement from pot sales that the provinces agreed to. The green-lighting of adult-use sales could generate an additional $5 billion in annual sales once the industry is fully ramped up.

Canadians bought a lot of weed last year

But truth be told, we don’t have to wait till this summer to see just how much Canadians love their cannabis. According to recently released data from Statistics Canada, an estimated 4.9 million Canadians between the ages of 15 and 64 purchased $4.6 billion (CA$5.7 billion) worth of marijuana in 2017. This works out to about $974 per cannabis consumer. Keep in mind that this includes medical marijuana, as well as recreational cannabis, which has been given the green light in some provinces.

How does this compare to other so-called vice industries, you wonder? Data shows that the alcohol and tobacco industries in Canada generated a respective $18.1 billion and $13 billion in sales in 2016. Though cannabis still has a long way to go to catch these traditional vice industries in sales, the Canadian pot industry does have a major leg up when it comes to domestic production. The vast majority of alcohol and tobacco sold in Canada is imported. Meanwhile, practically all of the cannabis sold to Canadians is grown within the country. In fact, sales of Canadian cannabis outside the country as a percentage of total production has increased from 2% in 1961 to 20% as of 2017. Canadian growers are finding consumers, whether they be domestic or abroad.

Here’s another interesting tidbit: according to Statistics Canada, more than 90% of the $4.6 billion sales figure were for non-medical purposes! This demonstrates just how much of a monster the recreational industry could be if the federal government continues to move along measures to legalize adult-use pot.

However, it’s also worth pointing out, per the data dump by Statistics Canada, that non-medical weed prices have been in a multi-year decline. It estimates that the price per gram for non-medical purposes has fallen by an average of 1.7% annually since 1990 to around $6.09 (CA$7.50) per gram in 2017. Comparatively, the Canadian Consumer Price Index has increased by an average of 1.9% annually over that same timeframe. This would suggest that volume may be needed by growers to make up for declining prices in the future, should this trend persist.

Consolidation should work in Canadian growers’ favor

Nonetheless, these trends generally point to positives for Canadian pot stocks. It shows that consumers are demanding cannabis, and that growers have multiple channels to reach these consumers, which includes domestic sales, expanded product lines, and exports to countries that have legalized medical weed.

Unlike the pot industry in the United States, the Canadian weed industry is also highly consolidated, which is a big reason it’s so successful. Though marijuana proponents in the U.S. favor the ability of small businesses to get in on the green rush, the consolidation of the Canadian industry is responsible for keeping growing costs down, and it’ll likely stem the aforementioned decline in cannabis prices over the past 27 years.

Four growers may wind up controlling around half of Canada’s market share when all is said and done, even with Health Canada easing restrictions and shortening the process to allow more licensees to grow cannabis. For example, Canopy Growth Corp. (NASDAQOTH:TWMJF), the largest marijuana stock by market cap, is currently developing or constructing 2.4 million square feet of growing capacity in British Columbia, and has the option of leasing an additional 1.7 million square feet in B.C. It’s possible that Canopy could control 15% of the total legal weed market when fully ramped up. It has the deep pockets and production capabilities to temporarily drive margins down, if need be, in order to push smaller businesses out of the picture.

As has been the case for some time now, investors looking to get in on the green rush should overlook what had previously been touted as the world’s top marijuana market, the United States, and instead focus on Canada, the current blueprint of success for the pot industry.

Marijuana stocks are overhyped: 10 better buys for you now
When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the ten best stocks for investors to buy right now… and marijuana stocks were noticeably absent! That’s right — they think these 10 stocks are better buys.

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Will New Jersey Marijuana Legalization Include Home Grow?

The Garden State seems to be gearing up to legalize weed. But will New Jersey marijuana legalization include home grow?

Will New Jersey marijuana legalization include home grow? As of now, the new governor of the state seems to only be insistent that adults be able to consume cannabis—not grow it.

“Marijuana legalization” doesn’t guarantee fully legal marijuana. Other states allow adults to grow small amounts of cannabis at home. Will New Jersey marijuana legalization allow home grow?

It’s far from certain.

What Legalization Should Do

New Jersey will almost certainly become the second state to legalize recreational marijuana without a ballot initiative.

But right now, Gov. Phil Murphy’s promise to allow adults 21 and over to use cannabis does not guarantee “home grow.”

This is a problem that needs fixing. Enter Reed Gusciora.

The state Assembly’s deputy leader, Gusciora wants to permit adults 21 and over to grow up to six cannabis plants at home.

“Looking at the marijuana laws in place in California, Oregon, Washington and the like, I thought that homegrown should be an essential element of the New Jersey law, too,” Gusciora told the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Should. Absolutely. But will home-grow be written into marijuana law in New Jersey?

The “Problem” With Home Grow

The New Jersey state Assembly and Senate are considering several legalization efforts. Gusciora, who co-authored the state’s medical-marijuana legislation, introduced his home-grow amendment to a proposal in the lower house.

Yet it’s still unclear which effort will reach Murphy’s desk. Gusciora’s bill would allow New Jersey residents to grow up to six plants. But only indoors, and only in a “controlled environment.”

Why so serious? Anyone who’s followed marijuana legalization for any length of time is familiar with the arguments legalization opponents trot out. A favorite hobbyhorse is a canard that cannabis automatically equals crime.

The notion that a few marijuana plants in someone’s backyard will cause gangsters and crooks to behave as if a supply of unguarded gold bouillon appeared in the neighborhood is false.

What’s news is Gusciora, a prosecutor, is willing to admit it. The problem is his colleagues behave as if it were true.

“They have visions of kids jumping over fences to steal Mrs. Smith’s marijuana plants,” he told the paper.

What About Hemp?

Gusciora is also pushing a bill that would legalize hemp farming.

An earlier effort to allow New Jersey residents to cultivate the non-psychoactive plant, good for fiber and fuel, died in 2012. For that, you can thank Chris Christie.

The state’s famously reactionary former governor also vowed to block a hemp bill.

For this reason, the bill died along with other efforts to expand the state’s extremely limited medical marijuana law.

By most measures, New Jersey’s medical marijuana law is terrible. Restrictions are so tough that through the end of 2016, fewer than 12,500 patients were enrolled.

Patients must also be “re-assessed” to see if they’re still sick enough to use cannabis every 90 days. And plenty of sick people who could benefit from marijuana aren’t sick enough: Jersey is only one of three states where chronic or “intractable pain” is not a qualifying condition.

In the context of an opiate crisis that kills 60,000 people a year, rules like these are criminal.

Home grow could help. So will New Jersey marijuana legalization allow home grow? Maybe not. In order for marijuana legalization to live, home grow may have to die.

Final Hit: Will New Jersey Marijuana Legalization Include Home Grow?

Christie is gone, but neither hemp farming nor home grow is a sure thing. Neither is legalization itself.

A recent poll found only 42 percent support among voters for legalization. And in preparation for legal cannabis, several townships have prepared by laying plans to ban it—even before the issue goes to a vote.

If legalization looks like it’s stalling out, home grow may be one of the first “rights” to go by the board. Stupid? Yes. But that’s how marijuana is legalized.

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