Here’s The Not-so-secret Reason Why Canada Has This Odd Marijuana Issue Recently, Health Canada Announced A Number Of Changes To Its Medical Marijuana Program.

The other issue is that a cannabis shortage provides the perfect opportunity for the black market to step in and illegally fill the gap. Trudeau has already proposed low taxes to keep pricing comparable between legal and black market weed, but if there’s not enough supply, there’s little that can be done. Even with the four Canadian producers listed above expanding their grow capacity considerably, it’d be a stretch to assume that all four will be up and running at full steam by July 2018. Here’s the not-so-secret reason why Canada has this odd marijuana issue Recently, Health Canada announced a number of changes to its medical marijuana program. With just 44 licenses issued, the regulatory agency that’s in charge of overseeing the welfare of its country’s citizens announced that it would approve more grow licenses and allow pot producers to Medical marijuana stocks essentially fill up their vaults as long as it could be done safely and securely. On the surface, this move by Health Canada seems to be a reaction to the idea that recreational marijuana could soon be approved. But dig a bit deeper and you’ll find there’s more to it than that. The real reason we could witness a marijuana shortage if Canada’s recreational weed bill passes is because a handful of Canadian medical cannabis producers have been exporting their product overseas. There are more than two dozen countries in the world with legal medical cannabis programs, but only Canada and the Netherlands have producers that are legally allowed to export their product to these countries. There are four Canadian producers that are currently exporting, including Canopy Growth, Aphria, Cronos Group, and Tilray. Germany provides the perfect example.

To read more visit https://www.fool.com/investing/2017/07/02/canada-has-a-very-odd-marijuana-problem-and-this-i.aspx

There Are Obvious Similarities Between Today’s Proliferation Of Pot Stocks And The California Gold Rush Of 1849.

It’s an exciting space to invest, though it’s clearly not risk-free with the federal government still looming. Wisely, SMG avoids the higher risk aspects of handling the substance, instead focusing on the lower-risk opportunity to simply supply the booming hydroponics industry. There are obvious similarities between today’s proliferation of “pot stocks” and the California Gold Rush of 1849. Not every prospector will make it. But the companies supplying those prospectors? That was where the smart money went in 1849 – the same is true today. Following the big money, like SMG, it’s clear why they’re investing heavily in the ability to “sell shovels” to cannabis handlers. SMG’s Hawthorne subsidiary and gardening segment accounted for about 13% of net sales last year, or $365 million, and the company reported 30% revenue growth from Hawthorne over the previous year. This was Hawthorne’s second full year in business. Solis Tek (OTCMKTS:SLTK) takes the same approach. The company is a manufacturer of digital lighting equipment (called “grow lights”) for the hydroponics industry. Solis Tek is one of these custom light providers, producing ballasts, reflectors, and Marijuana Stocks HID lights, with some of the most respected custom products on the market; Dope Magazine dubbed Solis Tek 2016’s “Best Lighting Company.” It may not sound as sexy as medicinal pot growing companies, but the market potential, and Solis Tek’s current growth and financials, are fundamentally sound.

To read more visit https://www.baystreet.ca/articles/stockstowatch.aspx?articleid=31202

But, Does He Stand By His Choice Of Selecting Them To Be A Part Of The Canopy Program Notwithstanding?

“Our investors very much fit that mold: they are high net worth individuals and they are family offices. We’ve got a total of about 40 to 45 investors who provide funding to our venture funds … and we protect them from immature entrepreneurs who are unable to get out of their own way.” We then moved on to discuss a few Canopy alumni who were not pleased with the results following the boot camp. “We make a lot of investments so I fully expect that 5 percent or 10 percent of our investments are going to go south and they’re going to end up failing. Sometimes those will cause some heartburn with different people,” the managing director answered. But, does he stand by his choice of selecting them to be a part of the Canopy program notwithstanding? Or does Tapman look back at it as a mistake? “I think it’s very easy to pretend like we made a mistake selecting some companies, but the reality is that you make decisions based on data that you have available at the time,” he said, sharing a sports metaphor. When a team wants to recruit a new athlete, it’s usually better to find a young man or woman with potential and invest in his/her future, instead of acquiring an extremely expensive, acclaimed athlete.

To read more visit Medical marijuana stocks href=’https://www.benzinga.com/news/17/06/9658646/pot-baron-on-canopyboulders-investments-we-focus-on-cos-that-can-scale-to-spectac’ rel=’nofollow’>https://www.benzinga.com/news/17/06/9658646/pot-baron-on-canopyboulders-investments-we-focus-on-cos-that-can-scale-to-spectac

It Instructed Justice Department Attorneys And Law Enforcement To “focus Their Enforcement Resources And Efforts, Including Prosecution, On Persons Or Organizations Whose Conduct Interferes With Any One Or More Of These Priorities, Regardless Of State Law”.

screen_shot_2017-05-30_at_5.14.18_pm.png Under the Obama administration, Attorney General James Cole issued a memo outlining the federal government’s priorities on marijuana enforcement. It instructed Justice Department attorneys and law enforcement to “focus their enforcement resources and efforts, including prosecution, on persons or organizations whose conduct interferes with any one or more of these priorities, regardless of state law”. You read that right, the Cole memo leaves the door open for federal enforcement, but these are the specific priorities the memo said the federal government should focus on preventing: Revenue from the sale of marijuana from going to criminal enterprises, gangs, and cartels The diversion Green Rush of marijuana from states where it is legal under state law in some form to other states State-authorized marijuana activity from being used as a cover or pretext for the trafficking of other illegal drugs or other illegal activity Violence and the use of firearms in the cultivation and distribution of marijuana Drugged driving and the exacerbation of other adverse public health consequences associated with marijuana use The growing of marijuana on public lands and the attendant public safety and environmental dangers posed by marijuana production on public lands Marijuana possession or use on federal property Canada legalized marijuana for medical use in 1999. Medical use faced tight regulations at first, but those have loosened over time. Now Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is following through on one of his campaign promises. He recently introduced legislation to legalize recreational marijuana use and, if all goes according to plan, the Canadian government hopes to allow legal sales by the middle of next year. Canada’s proposed law requires purchasers to be at least 18 years old and limits the amount you can have to 30 grams, which is close to the recreational use amounts allowed in Colorado and California. The Canadian government will license and supervise commercial growers, similar to the current regulations they have in place for the cultivation of medical marijuana. The proposed law would eliminate certain legal risks for Canadian companies that American companies are still exposed to. There are pharmaceutical companies developing cannabis-based treatments for a variety of uses. Several have developed marijuana-based treatments that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and others are in the process.

To read more visit https://www.benzinga.com/general/education/17/05/9539243/investing-in-marijuana-stocks-dont-let-your-money-go-up-in-smoke

31, 1997, With The Dividends Reinvested Would Now Be Worth $85,572.14.

marijuana stocks with dividends On top of the skyrocketing stock price, the dividend payout has increased for 13 years straight. And the profits from the second marijuana stock with dividends we are about to show you are even more staggering. A $10,000 investment in this stock on Dec. 31, 1997, Medical marijuana with the dividends reinvested would now be worth $85,572.14. In comparison, the shares would only be worth $70,585.55 if the dividends weren’t reinvested. That means reinvesting dividends would’ve boosted your return by 21%. This stock has climbed 451% since it traded for $15.13 per share on Dec. 31, 1997. On top of that, this company has increased its dividend payout for the last seven years.

To read more visit https://moneymorning.com/2017/06/13/two-marijuana-stocks-with-dividends-to-own-right-now/

The Law Will Make It Legal For Anyone In The Country Over 18 Years Old To Possess Small Amounts Of Marijuana.

So how do you think the markets will react when legalization goes nationwide? We’re about to get a sneak preview, thanks to some pending legislation. The law will make it legal for Medical marijuana stocks anyone in the country over 18 years old to possess small amounts of marijuana. It will also give companies permission to market and sell marijuana products. Politicians seem in favor of passing the law… and it could go into effect as early as July 1, 2018. The twist is that it’s not American companies that will profit… and I’m not talking about proposed legislation in the United States. Instead, this legislation is happening in Canada. The companies that are poised to benefit the most are in the Great White North. As you may know, marijuana was criminalized across the United States in October 1937.

To read more visit https://dailyreckoning.com/path-riches-leads-north/

This Is Particularly True For Biotechs Developing Cannabinoid Drugs.

The share price of Aurora Cannabis (NASDAQOTH: ACBFF), for example, quadrupled in 2016 thanks in part to increased acceptance of medical marijuana in Canada. Aurora began selling medical marijuana in Jan. 2016 and had registered 10,800 active patients by late November. Aurora’s success, though, didn’t come about just because Canadians were more accepting of medical marijuana. The company took the right steps to reach out to patients and expanded its infrastructure quickly to keep up with demand. Others weren’t so smart and didn’t perform as well as Aurora did. Some marijuana stocks have achieved success for reasons other than increased public acceptance of marijuana. This is particularly true for biotechs developing cannabinoid drugs. For instance,GW Pharmaceuticals’ (NASDAQ: GWPH) stock soared in 2016 based on its pipeline success.

To read more visit Medical marijuana href=’http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2017/01/01/3-myths-about-marijuana-stocks.html’ rel=’nofollow’>http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2017/01/01/3-myths-about-marijuana-stocks.html

But Despite These Antics The Industry Has Been Too Attractive To Resist For Some Investors.

Suddenly everyone wants a slice of an industry that is already worth billions. The reaction to Shoenmakers’ appointment is thanks to the Australian/Dutch dual national’s legendary cannabis breeding reputation – fans lauded him as “The King of Cannabis” and the United States try to extradite him from Australia in the early 1990s. Arrested in Perth, he posted bail and then disappeared . The founder of Australia’s first listed medical cannabis company, Ross Smith, is only a few shades less colourful. He floated Phytotech (now MMJ Phytotech) on the ASX in January 2015 to a roaring response – climbing from 20?? on issue to 92?? on their second day – only to resign marijuana as executive director two weeks later over a threatening social media rant. Smith said his Facebook account had been hacked. But despite these antics the industry has been too attractive to resist for some investors. To give a sense of scale consider that medical marijuana sales hit $US4.9 billion ($6.5 billion) in the United States last year and will reach $US7.3 billion in 2020, according to research by marijuana investment group Archview.

To read more visit http://www.thecourier.com.au/story/4636580/how-high-is-too-high-for-australias-cannabis-stocks/?cs=9

Cara Is Angling Its Two Experimental Products In Development, Cr845 And Cr701, At Either Acute Or Chronic Pain, Or Pruritus, Which Is A Really Just Fancy Word For Severe Itching.

Better Know a Marijuana Stock: Cara Therapeutics With Marijuana Stocks this in mind, we’re going to take the time to analyze one marijuana stock each week until we’ve dissected all of the major players (i.e., those sporting a $200 million market cap, or larger). Here are the companies we’ve discussed so far; Today, we’re going to take a closer look at Cara Therapeutics (NASDAQ: CARA). Cara Therapeutics is a drug developer that shares a key similarity with Insys Therapeutics: its drug development pipeline isn’t entirely devoted to cannabinoid or endocannabinoid-mimetic drugs. In fact, Cara Therapeutics, which is entirely clinical-stage at this point, is almost exclusively focused on developing CR845, a kappa opioid receptor agonist (KORA) that has nothing to do with cannabis. We’ll get into Cara’s more direct cannabis ties in a moment. Cara is angling its two experimental products in development, CR845 and CR701, at either acute or chronic pain, or pruritus, which is a really just fancy word for severe itching. For the time being, Cara’s future lies with the development of its KORA-based drug, CR845, which is being dosed in IV and oral form in various ongoing studies. KORAs generally have a poor ability to transcend the blood-brain barrier, unlike opioid therapies, meaning they’re an ideal candidate to treat pain (and pruritus) without the traditional central nervous system side effects seen with opioids that can include nausea, sedation, depression, and addiction. CR845 is being advanced in four clinical studies: two IV formulations that include post-operative pain and pruritis associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and two oral formulations for chronic pain and general pruritus. In late March, Cara reported promising results from Part A of its phase 2/3 study of IV CR845 in CKD-associated pruritus, with the experimental therapy meeting both its primary and secondary endpoints.

To read more visit http://host.madison.com/business/investment/markets-and-stocks/better-know-a-marijuana-stock-cara-therapeutics/article_ca2b7c2f-9d85-55b8-995c-21cf4942378d.html

“it’s Quite A Journey We Have All Been On Since The Medical Cannabis Regulation And Safety Act Was Passed In 2015,” Ajax Said.

64, which legalized adult-use cannabis in the state. Regulations for production and sale of adult-use cannabis are expected by January 2018. “It’s quite a journey we have all been on since the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act was passed in 2015,” Ajax said. “I didn’t realize what I was getting into. I didn’t realize how much different cannabis is from alcohol. Alcohol is simple to understand. Cannabis is a lot more complicated. I had to start over to learn how best to regulate this industry.” The first panel was on how to invest in the cannabis industry. Speakers included Green Rush Emily and Morgan Paxhia, co-founders of Poseidon Asset Management, a San Francisco-based investment fund dedicated to funding cannabis-related enterprise.

To read more visit http://www.northbaybusinessjournal.com/northbay/sonomacounty/6975592-181/north-coast-cannabis-industry-conference